First Previous - Page 1 of 1 - Next Last

Holiday calculator

  • Fellow
  • Practice Licence
  • 51 posts
  • # 118031

Hi All

Every month I use the HMRC holiday calculaor to work out current holiday entitlement for one of my clients as they all have irregular hours.  I have just put in my usual search for the calculator link but cannot find it.  Does anyone know if HMRC have taken it down or am I not seeing it.  If anyone has the link I would be most grateful.

 

Thanks

Jane

  • Member PM.Dip
  • Practice Licence
  • 740 posts
  • # 118037

one of my clients had the same problem, think they have taken it down but not sure why.

 

  • Fellow PM.Dip
  • Practice Licence
  • 12 posts
  • # 118040

JC.BKS said:

Hi All

Every month I use the HMRC holiday calculaor to work out current holiday entitlement for one of my clients as they all have irregular hours.  I have just put in my usual search for the calculator link but cannot find it.  Does anyone know if HMRC have taken it down or am I not seeing it.  If anyone has the link I would be most grateful.

 

Thanks

Jane


 Hello, not sure if this helps but the percentage to apply is 12.07%

  • Fellow
  • Practice Licence
  • 51 posts
  • # 118045

Thanks Lainy, at least I know I was not losing it, although I think I lost about half an hour trying to find the link.

Welly your reply helps a lot, and knowing that % will make life easier.

Jane

  • Affiliate
  • 4 posts
  • # 118054

Hi There,

 

I found this and seems to work and quotes the 12.07%.

 

https://goodcalculators.com/holiday-entitlement-calculator/

 

  • Payroll Agent
  • Practice Licence
  • 14 posts
  • # 118059

Hi Just wanted to add that holiday entitlement and holiday pay are calculated separately. This is more important if the employee works with multiple hourly rates.

 

The usual process for someone entitled to the statutory minimum of 5.6 weeks would be to multiply the number of hours worked by 12.07%.

Then to calculate the holiday pay, you would need to work out the average hourly rate using a 12 week reference period. So total pay divided by hours worked to give the average hourly rate.

 

Then for the holiday payout would be the number of hours entitlement being used multiplied by the average hourly rate. 

 

The reference period will increase to 52 weeks from next year. 

 

The full guidance including examples published by BEIS can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/826727/holiday-pay-guidance-august_2019.pdf#targetText=Holiday%20pay%20is%20based%20on,weeks'%20paid%20holiday%20per%20year. 

  • Fellow
  • Practice Licence
  • 51 posts
  • # 118061

Thanks Ruthiu and Kevin, more useful information and links.

on another issue if an employee does not take there annual leave by the end of a holiday period what is the legal stance an employer should take, I understand there are theee options:

1. Pay them holiday pay as an additional paymenot, which I believe is not strictly legal as this would discourage employees from taking leave,

2. Employee loses their entitlement to their accrued leave as they have not taken it, not sure on any legal stance fir this, or

3, leave is rolled over to the following year.

Thanks once again

Jane

 

  • Payroll Agent
  • Practice Licence
  • 14 posts
  • # 118064

If the employee only receives the statutory entitlement 5.6 weeks/28 days, they cannot be paid out for unused holiday at the end of the holiday year. 

They can at the employer's discretion carry over up to 8 days holiday to the next holiday year.  

The entitlement is made up of:

EU Leave - 4weeks/20 days - this must be used within the holiday year and cannot be carried over

UK Leave - 1.6 weeks/8days - this is to cover the 8 UK Bank Holidays - this can be carried over at the employer's discretion, there is no employee right to carry over. 

 

Usually salaried employees can only be paid for accrued but unused holiday pay when they leave employment

  • Fellow
  • Practice Licence
  • 51 posts
  • # 118065

Thanks Kevin

Jane

First Previous - Page 1 of 1 - Next Last
loading